Courses I Teach

 F2F Course |  Hybrid Course |  Online Course

Summer 2016

English 5010 | Studies in Fiction |  
The “Fiction” of Orwell and Huxley

ENGL 5010-090 Summer 2016 | Full Course

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Description

In this course we will explore the chilling and thrilling dystopian novels Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, and 1984, by George Orwell. Although we will likely discover together many interesting and productive ways to approach these texts, our governing theme will be the expression and suppression of desire and the relationship between desire and control. Traditional readings of these two works situate Huxley’s world as being controlled through uninhibited free-will and pleasure, and Orwell’s through forced ignorance and fear. But neither novel is  so simple. We will put pressure on these traditional readings, and with the help of some critical and theoretical sources, examine the complex institutional and social structures that both novels present. And, perhaps, in the process, we will learn a little something about ourselves as well.

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Reflection

Under revision . .

Summer 2015

English 5010 | Studies in Fiction |  
The “Fiction” of Orwell and Huxley

ENGL 5010-001 Summer 2015 | Syllabus

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Description

In this course we will explore the chilling and thrilling dystopian novels Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, and 1984, by George Orwell. Although we will likely discover together many interesting and productive ways to approach these texts, our governing theme will be the expression and suppression of desire and the relationship between desire and control. Traditional readings of these two works situate Huxley’s world as being controlled through uninhibited free-will and pleasure, and Orwell’s through forced ignorance and fear. But neither novel is  so simple. We will put pressure on these traditional readings, and with the help of some critical and theoretical sources, examine the complex institutional and social structures that both novels present. And, perhaps, in the process, we will learn a little something about ourselves as well.

Student Course Feedback

Reflection

Under revision . .

Spring 2013

Writing 2010 | Intermediate Writing |  
Rhetoric and Writing

WRTG 2010-093 Spring 2013 | Syllabus**

Description

2010 focuses on developing college-level writing skills. But it is also a course on rhetoric―a tradition of using language and other symbol systems for persuasive purposes. Even if all of the writing you do in college from now on seems to be objective reporting, it is still intended to have effects on readers. You may need your readers to agree with you or follow through with a course of action, or you may need to upset their expectations or present “bad news.”

Even though people write in and out of universities for a wide variety of reasons, many compositional and rhetorical strategies remain consistent across genres. This course will help you learn and practice a collection of those strategies, ranging from topic selection and issue focus to whole-discourse organization to sentence rhythm and word choice.

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Reflection

Under revision . .

Fall 2012

Writing 2010 | Intermediate Writing |  
Rhetoric and Writing

WRTG 2010-045 Fall 2012 | Syllabus*

Description

2010 focuses on developing college-level writing skills. But it is also a course on rhetoric―a tradition of using language and other symbol systems for persuasive purposes. Even if all of the writing you do in college from now on seems to be objective reporting, it is still intended to have effects on readers. You may need your readers to agree with you or follow through with a course of action, or you may need to upset their expectations or present “bad news.”

Even though people write in and out of universities for a wide variety of reasons, many compositional and rhetorical strategies remain consistent across genres. This course will help you learn and practice a collection of those strategies, ranging from topic selection and issue focus to whole-discourse organization to sentence rhythm and word choice.

Student Course Feedback
Student Course Feedback | Mid-semester

Reflection

Under revision . .

**This is a PDF of the syllabus made available to students through the LMS (Canvas); it is revised from the WRTG 2010 syllabus distributed by the Writing Department, author Jay Jordan.

*This syllabus is revised from the WRTG 2010 syllabus distributed by the Writing Department, author Jay Jordan.